Cheated by Copper Project

So for our digital marketing agency, Indigo Consulting, we were looking for a SAAS-based Project Management System that would help us manage large and small digital marketing projects, and track time sheets. Copper Project was referred to us by a friend in the US office of a large advertising network, so we did our evaluation and invested significant time in setting up the system for our needs, training our staff etc. While the product seemed to have most of the features we needed, some basic things like reports, ability to view your own time sheets etc were missing which they kept saying they would consider for a future release.

However 2-3 months into usage, we found the the performance of the site had dropped considerably. With barely 110-115 users, the site would often time-out, or worse, just would not record an entry. When we raised this issue, they said they would try and work on it. In the meantime, we had to suspend use of the PMS.

Eventually, they admitted they will NOT be able to resolve the problem (which in itself was surprising considering it is a cloud-based project management system and availability is a prerequisite), and themselves offered to provide a refund.

Copper Project offer for Refund

We even suggested that we could then perhaps opt for upgrading to the next version where we can get the source code and install it in our own network. The fees already paid could be adjusted against the same.

However, after that we NEVER heard from them. There was no response to any of our emails or phone calls. It was then that we realised we are dealing with more of a shell than a company. There are NO proper contact details on the website – the link just leads to some anonymous info@ email ID. There is no background on the company, the owners, management etc. During the course of our interactions on support, we only had the contact of one Ben Prendergast, who refused to respond to emails or phone calls.

After 3 months of futile attempts, I finally sent a DM to their Twitter Account (http://www.twitter.com/copperproject) to which I finally got a response. Shockingly, they FLATLY REFUSED to offer a refund and claimed they had “retracted” the refund offer and that we were harassing them by continuing to follow-up!!! We had, of course, received no such email, so we asked them to forward the email. Which was again met with silence. Cos obviously the cheats never sent the email and were now hiding behind lies.

The failure of the Copper Project PMS can be understood – not all products are killers. But the attitude of the company, the anonymity of the management, and most of all their string of lies and lack of accessibility, were shocking to say the least. Trust and confidence is the bedrock of any successful relationship, and Copper Project clearly does not care for these values.

Besides the fees paid for a product that does not work, we also lost considerable time and effort, and of course all the data.

We have since started using Zoho Projects and are so far quite happy with the product and the support response times, although its only been about a couple of months.

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Founded and run one of India's leading Interactive Marketing Agencies called Indigo Consulting (www.indigo.co.in). Based in Mumbai. Love the city. Love music, gadgets, travelling, the Internet. Check out our company blog Mood Indigo at www.indigo.co.in/blog.

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Posted in Business & Economy, Web 2.0
One comment on “Cheated by Copper Project
  1. Applicom says:

    Hi,

    It pains me, when I read stories like these. I co-founded one of their competitors, “Apollo” (http://www.apollohq.com). I am not trying to grab you as a customer (you obviously have made a choice, which I think will be beneficial!).

    What I want to say is that you are right. Andrea and I (Tony Mobily) are the founders of Apollo, and had the guts to put our faces to it. We sign every blog post. I am very much a public figure in the IT world, having contributed a small mountain of code to open source projects, and written a couple of hundred editorial articles and technical guides.

    I personally don’t understand why you’d hide behind a web site. I won’t hide that I am in Italy, right now, enjoying the Northern Hemisphere summer (I normally live in Australia!). Our company is based in the US, has operations in the US, and we could well hide behind a faceless corporation. But… why would we?

    So, from the SaaS world… “sorry”. And to other people reading this post: make sure you can always put a clear face to the maker of the SaaS you use…

    Bye,

    Merc.

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